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How to Keep Your Bitcoin Safe and Secure from scammers & hackers so Watch These Videos

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Owning cryptocurrency isn’t quite the Wild West experience it was at the beginning of the decade, but investors still face plenty of instability and risk. The threats aren’t just abstract or theoretical; new scams crop up, and old ones resurge, all the time. Whether it’s a fake wallet set up to trick users, a phishing attempt to steal private cryptographic keys, or even fake cryptocurrency schemes, there’s something to watch out for at every turn.

Cryptocurrencies can feel secure, because they decentralize and often anonymize digital transactions. They also validate everything on public, tamper-resistant blockchains. But those measures don’t make cryptocurrencies any less susceptible to the types of simple, time-honored scams grifters have relied on in other venues. Just this week, scams have arisen that divert funds from users’ mining rigs to malicious wallets, because victims forgot to change default login credentials. Search engine phishing scams that tout malicious trading sites over legitimate exchanges have also spiked. And a trojan called CryptoShuffler has stolen thousands of dollars by lurking on computers, and spying on Bitcoin wallet addresses that land in copy/paste clipboards.

A few simple steps, though, can help cryptocurrency proponents—be it Bitcoin or Monero or anything between—guard against a swath of common attacks. Just as you might keep your cash out of plain sight, or stash your jewelry in a safe deposit box, it pays to put a little effort into how you manage your cryptocurrency. The following won’t defend against every conceivable attack on your digital doubloons, but it’s a good place to start.

Cold, Hard (Digital) Cash

A key step to protecting your cryptocurrency is to store anything of significant value in a hardware wallet—a physical device, like a USB drive, that stores your private keys and currency locally, and isn’t connected to the internet. Experts caution against storing large amounts of coins through cryptocurrency exchanges, or in digital wallet apps on your smartphone or computer. The public-facing internet offers an attacker too many inroads to attempt to infiltrate your wallet, or trick you into giving them access.

Secure hardware wallets like Trezor or the Ledger Nano S cost about $100 or less and have a straightforward setup. You just choose a PIN number and a recovery “seed” (usually a set of words and numbers) in case you forget your PIN, or your wallet malfunctions. It’s pretty robust security, so make sure you keep copies of your PIN and seed somewhere accessible to you, but not to home intruders. Recovering currency stored on a hardware wallet after losing both the PIN and the seed is a whole thing. Emin Gun Sirer, a distributed systems and cryptography researcher at Cornell University, goes so far as to suggest that you should “keep a backup of the seed key in a fireproof safe.” This stuff is for real.

Your setup also doesn’t have to be fancy; you can store backups of your coins on any external storage device, like a portable hard drive. Just make sure to encrypt the data in case the device is lost or stolen. You might even consider making a backup to leave in a safe deposit box.

Big Spender

The downside to a hardware wallet is that it makes approving transactions a bit cumbersome. If you want more fluid access to your cryptocurrency, experts suggest storing a small amount in a wallet app to facilitate low-value transactions. The key here: Only keep an amount you would be willing to lose in the app, and never give anyone your private key.

Apps like Mycelium Wallet that are interoperable with popular hardware wallets can make your setup more seamless. And some app-based options like Samourai Wallet are working to prioritize robust encryption and privacy features. Still, don’t trust any app with too much cryptocash right now.

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Additionally, consider where you store your private keys, the secret part of the public-private key set that lets you authorize revisions to a blockchain. Always keep them encrypted, and try to avoid leaving them lying around on devices that you use all the time for a lot of different tasks, like your personal PC.

Also consider your transactions carefully. There are tons of established, reliable institutions, but gimmicky new cryptocurrencies crop up all the time, as well as questionable Initial Coin Offerings that could have nothing behind them but scammers on the move. When the cryptocurrency OneCoin, marketed as a Bitcoin competitor, launched this year people bought about $350 million-worth of the coins—which has since drawn comparisons to a Ponzi scheme. And people are even being scammed during legitimate ICOs when attackers launch phishing attacks around the events, or trick would-be investors into sending money to fake wallets. (The Securities and Exchange Commission is poking hard on this.)

Nail the Basics

It’s also important to remember that all the small things you’re already doing (right?) to protect your general digital life help defend your cryptocurrency as well. “We encourage all customers to take a few foundational, and free, actions to put them on a much more stable security footing,” says Philip Martin, director of security at the cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase. “Use a password manager, use two-factor authentication, leverage enhanced security protocols for your email address.”

For the especially concerned, Martin even suggests turning on Gmail’s new Advanced Protection feature, and/or adding defenses like a PIN or password to your phone number to make it harder for attackers to grab control of your accounts by transferring your SIM to their own device.

All of these suggestions bolster your general digital security hygiene, but they are particularly helpful for reducing your exposure to the most simple (sometimes impressively so) cryptocurrency scams that can take advantage of small things, like a reused password and no second authentication requirement, to walk in the front door of one of your accounts.

Take that CryptoShuffler trojan, which originally emerged more than a year ago and has been making the rounds again this week. It shows just how basic cryptocurrency scams can be. The malware works by lurking silently on a victim’s computer and passively monitoring their clipboard, waiting for the victim to copy a Bitcoin wallet address. When it sees a string of numbers that looks right, CryptoShuffler simply starts swapping the wallet ID the victim copied for its own malicious wallet address in payment fields. If the victim doesn’t spot the change, the transaction goes through and the coins go to the crooks.

The best way to defend against an attack like that (if your malware scanner doesn’t detect the intrusion) is simply watching all transactions carefully, and taking steps to safeguard your assets so you know your data hasn’t been exposed.

And once you have the basics in place, make sure your friends adopt the same mindset. The more secure the ecosystem, the less attractive a target it is to bad actors. “Help newcomers to crypto with their security,” Cornell’s Sirer says. “The area is new and we need to support the people who are just finding their way in.”

Luckily, you don’t need to be a cryptography expert to take the basic security steps that will protect you against the majority of attacks. And seriously, if nothing else, don’t lose that wallet seed.

Man in Qld Australia scammed of $400,000 for worthless scrap paper

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A WEALTHY Queensland man has lost $400,000 buying blackened “US bank notes” that turned out to be worthless pieces of scrap paper.

The notorious “black money” sting has hit Queensland before, but never on the scale inflicted on one hapless investor in Brisbane.

In a separate scam, two pensioner brothers from Longreach have been fleeced of $350,000 after being conned into believing they’d won a $23 million lottery.

And a Brisbane woman was talked into buying $89,000 worth of iTunes cards after being convinced she was helping Telstra catch computer hackers.

Police say these are some of the latest victims of a barrage of scams hitting the state, with 90 Queenslanders a day reporting they have been conned.

In the “black money” sting, scammers convinced the victim they had genuine US bank notes that had been coated in black paint.

A liquid solution was meant to clean the notes, but after buying them at a reduced rate the victim was scrap paper rather than the millions of dollars in profit that had been promised.

The scheme is also known as the Nigerian “wash wash” scam due to it reportedly originating in the African country about 17 years ago.

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The Longreach brothers were in partial care when they were told they had won 15.5 million euros ($23.2 million).

They had been targeted by what is known as an “advance fee fraud”, in which victims hand over money on the promise they will receive a lottery win or inheritance.

Detective Superintendent Terry Lawrence, head of the police Financial and Cyber Crimes Group, warned that vulnerable people were still falling for the scam despite it operating for years.

“They pushed $350,000 out in the belief they would be getting all these millions back,” Supt Lawrence said.

“It was their life savings for their care and everything like that. It’s just gone.”

The iTunes card scam involved a fake Telstra worker convincing the Brisbane woman her computer had been hacked.

The scammer then convinced the woman Telstra was transferring money to her account to help catch the hacker.

Over three days in July, she bought $89,000 worth of iTunes cards and handed them over, her money gone with little chance of a recovery.

The names of major brands such as energy retailers, phone companies and supermarkets are frequently used in the scams.

Bargain hunters, gamblers, online dating users and business owners are among those targeted, with some schemes tailored to match the time of the year.

“At tax time they do the Australian Taxation Office. Come Christmas it will be online sales or hotel accommodation,” Supt Lawrence said.

But it is believed only a fraction of those scammed report their losses to authorities.

In a recent investigation into a Gold Coast boiler room operation, police established there were about 1000 victims but only 200 came forward.

“A lot of people don’t report because they’re embarrassed – or it’s an amount they don’t think is worth reporting,” Supt Lawrence said.

Detective Senior Constable Andrew Browne, also from the financial crimes squad, said scam messages purporting to be from firms such as Telstra or Origin Energy were sent to 100,000 people or more at a time.

“They know they’re the biggest providers of power or phone bills so therefore they’ve got their biggest chance of success. They’re all trusted brands people use,” Constable Browne said.

In another scam busted by police this year, a Gold Coast man who paid for a brand-name BBQ was one of hundreds of people who ordered goods from a sham online trader that never delivered.

Two Latvian fake traders were advertising discounted Weber barbecues and other goods online but customers never received them. The pair was arrested in Brisbane and charged with multiple counts of fraud.

A new Queensland police campaign, R U in Control, is publicising scams as they occur.

Supt Lawrence said: “If people just take that second to have a bit of a think before falling for it, we could prevent much of this fraud together. You decide, not the scammers.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Residents warned as scammers rip off $60k in telephone scam

Police are warning people to be aware of a sophisticated telephone scam.

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QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA SUNSHINE Coast residents have been warned about a sophisticated scam which has been resurrected to great effect, ripping victims off to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars.

Police are warning people to be wary of the scam, which involves a call to a home phone from a telecommunications provider.

The demanding caller tells the residents their computer has been hacked and insists they press specific keys on the keyboard (windows key and the letter ‘r’).

A second person then comes on the line and tells the resident they need money to catch the scammer and asks for a credit card number and PIN, before ringing on the mobile phone and asks to stay on the line.

The victim is then told to withdraw money from the bank and then asked to attend certain retail shops and buy gift cards.

Still on the line, the scammer tells the victim to display the PIN and gift card details to the computer camera, which has been taken over by scammers.

This goes on for several days and can include a number of requests for purchases to be made, including plane tickets.

Acting Detective Superintendent Terry Lawrence of the Financial and Cyber Crimes Group said one victim had lost $20,000 through the scam.

“The actions of these criminals targeting the vulnerable members of our community is deplorable, they don’t care who they hurt, they just want your money,” he said.

“This scam is very specific however I urgently warn all members to be vigilant when it comes to unsolicited calls and a request or demand to make payment by gift cards of any type.

“Businesses and government organisations will not seek payment in this way, nor will they request remote access to your computer. The callers are criminals who are stealing your money. Please, I urge you to not comply and hang up immediately. Report the call to Scamwatch or ACORN.”

Coast IT guru and owner of ID Care, Dr David Lacey, said they’d seen a spike in both telephone and remote-access scams in the past few months.

He said his company was doing about 200 engagements a week with victims of cyber crime and about one-third were calls from victims of telephone scams.

Dr Lacey said scammers were often using telephone calls to gain remote access to computers, then installing ransomware to further extort their victims.

“It’s certainly ratcheting up,” Dr Lacey said.

He estimated about a million calls a month were being made to victims in Australia.

Victims that had contacted him were suffering significant financial losses, with one victim even having up to $60,000 withdrawn from their superannuation account by scammers.

He said victims often blamed themselves, but added it had nothing to do with intelligence, as the scammers were highly manipulative.

“It’s not just about the technology, it’s mostly about the emotional and confidence (damage caused by scammers),” Dr Lacey said.

Victims can report scams to www.scamwatch.gov.au or www.acorn.gov.au

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www.crimefiles.net

www.intelagencies.com

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Henry Sapiecha

DATING SITE SCAMS 15 VIDEOS – SERIES 2

1…Panorama Tainted Love Secrets of the Dating Game BBC documentary 2013

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2…Beware Nigerian Online Dating Scams

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3…10 Most Horrifying Real Online Dating Scams

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4…Romance Scams ~ The Faces Behind The Masquerade

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5…Exposing How Women Manipulate Men

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6…CyberGuy on Dr. Phil: How To Avoid Catfish Dating Scams

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7…Insight: Video Scams – Love Bait

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8…Romance fraud – Mastermind Ghanaian Romance Scammer

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9…We Find Them: Mr. Right Turns Out Wrong

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10…Online Dating Secrets to Being More Desirable

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11…10 CRAZY Online Dating Experiences

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12…How to Tell Fake Profiles on Dating Sites

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13…Online Dating Site Scam

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14…International Dating Scams – Who Are You Really Talking To?

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15…5 Cruel Online Dating Scams

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Henry Sapiecha

SCAMMERS 15 VIDEOS TO WATCH FOR YOUR PROTECTION-SERIES 1

1…Secrets of The Scammers (Fraud Documentary)

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2…Nigerian Scams Documentary 2016 : Nigerian Scammers Show No Mercy !

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3…$500,000 scammed from a woman by 5 NIGERIANS

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4…Woman loses $150,000 in online dating scam

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5…BBC Series “You have been Scammed – Street Lottery Scam”

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6…Bernie Madoff : Scamming of America – The $50 Billion Ponzi Scheme

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7…How Suze Orman SCAMMED the World (2016)

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8…Internet Scammers – Documentary 2015

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9…Internet Scammers and Caught on Tape

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10…Credit card Scammers caught on camera

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11…Credit Card Thieves Caught on Tape Using Skimmers | Nightline | ABC News

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12…SCAMMED in China – The man trap

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13…Wham Bam Thank You Scam

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14…Scam City Delhi – Should Not Be Missed

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15…Scam City | Rio de Janeiro | Full Episode

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Henry Sapiecha

GOLD BULLION SCAMS ARE WORLDWIDE IN MOST COUNTRIES VIDEO SHOWS

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Henry Sapiecha

Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar in this great video presentation

On any given day we’re lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and “hotspots” used by those trained to recognize deception — and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the “Sixth Sense” wearable tech, and “Lost” producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate.

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Henry Sapiecha

This is what happens when you reply to spam email | James Veitch on video

Published on Feb 1, 2016

Suspicious emails: unclaimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safe deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. They pop up in our inboxes, and standard procedure is to delete on sight. But what happens when you reply? Follow along as writer and comedian James Veitch narrates a hilarious, months-long exchange with a spammer who offered to cut him in on a hot deal.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.

Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate

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Henry Sapiecha

Fake Silver Coins: 13 Ways to Spot Counterfeits

real-vs-fake-silver-eagle image www.scamsfakes.com

It is unfortunate that articles like this have to be written,
but where there is money trading hands, there will always be fakes, frauds, and counterfeits.

If you have purchased some silver and can’t get rid of that little voice in your head that keeps saying what if they are fake silver coins …

Below are 13 ways on how to spot fake silver eagles, bars, and bullion. We’ve ranked them from the least to the most effective methods in detecting counterfeits. (Most of these tests can also be applied to gold as well)

1. Magnetic Test

While many fakes can easily pass this test, silver as well as gold bullion for that matter are both non-magnetic. If a bullion coin or bar sticks to a magnet you can easily throw this one out. Fakes that are produced with any iron or steel content in them will give off some magnetic attraction and identify itself as a fake. Metals that have a core of zinc, copper, lead or other non-magnetic metal will not be detected by this test.

The stronger the magnet the better, a neodymium magnet (grade N52) should be able to detect any iron or steel based metal. Be careful these magnets are extremely strong, fun to play with too! If it sticks it tricks.

neodymium-silver-test image www.scamsfakes.com

2. Magnetic Slide Test

Continuing on with magnets, another test you can to spot counterfeit silver is using a magnetic slide. Simple and easy to build, this is a fun way to instantly spot fakes without any complicated testing.

How it works: even though silver is non-magnetic it has a property known as diamagnetism. This causes silver to repel when in contact with a magnetic field. So real silver moving down a magnetic slide will move slower than fake silver. A fake will move down the slide with no resistance. Check out the video below, it’s actually pretty cool:

3. The Ice Test

Cheap and easy to do, getting some ice from the freezer is a simple way to test both silver coins and bars for authenticity. All you need to do is place the ice on the silver and watch.

The ice should begin to melt immediately, this is because silver is the best conductor of heat for all the metals. Below is a chart on thermal conductivity amongst popular metals. You will see that silver tops them all even including copper which is the most popular metal to use. This makes it extremely useful in electronics and as an industrial metal, check out 101 uses of silver, and you will see how useful this metal really is!

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Check out how fast silver will melt ice compared to a regular pan:

4. Dimensions Test

This type of test only applies to bullion coins from government mints. Since the most popular is the American Silver Eagle, we will take a look at that particular coin. You can view the specs of the Silver Eagle below:

silver-eagle-specs image www.scamsfakes.com

The best way to take advantage of this is by using a good digital electronic scale. You will want to get a scale that measures at least to 2 decimal points in grams. Here is the one that I use, you can buy it on Amazon for about $11.

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Silver Eagles have a minted weight of 1 Troy oz. ~ 31.103 grams. Another easy give away is the diameter of the coin, this should be pretty exact at ~40.6mm. To check this you will want a good set of calipers. A nice digital entry-level set is this one. If you want to get the top of the line calipers go with the brand Mitutoyo.

When weighing your coins, be sure to account for a certain tolerance or variance in the weight. There is no official guideline given, but anything from 31.1g – 31.8g should be OK. If you are getting readings of 30g or 32g+ that is reason for concern.

Another tool to test for the dimensions of the American Silver Eagle is The Fisch. It can correctly verify the weight, thickness, diameter, and shape of 4 different coins. It also can check for the Canadian Maple Leaf, the Austrian Vienna Philharmonic, and the US Silver Dollar (1840-1935). At $169 though, overpriced in my opinion, as a basic digital scale and good set of calipers will do the same. My magnetic slide at $39 is a much better deal

silver-fisch coin tester image www.scamsfakes.com

5. Visual Test

Silver has a distinctive look and feel to the coin not too shiny and not too cloudy. Grab an old magnifier, the one’s that jeweler’s use, and take a good look at the coin. It’s always best to have an authentic coin or bar next to the one you are examining. Mismatched surfaces, text spacing, crevices, or edges will stand out if it is a fake.

Your tool of choice for this test is a handy magnifying glass or a jeweler’s loupe. A loupe if a special magnifying glass without the handle with higher magnification due to its special lens. These are essential to the world of coin collecting & numismatics, making it easier to grade the quality as well as identify counterfeit coins such as fake silver dollars.

You can pick one up pretty cheap on Amazon for about $5. Just be sure to get one at least 10x the magnification. Looking at enough real silver eagles, will give you a trained eye to easily spot the fakes.

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A dead giveaway is the edges of the coin or reeding. If there are no grooves or reeds, there is a 99.9% chance it is a fake since minted coins non-reeded (errors) are extremely rare. Examine where the coin meets the rim and between the reeds, sometimes silver-plated coins will not fill these in and with a proper magnifying glass they will be detected.

Below we have a real vs. fake American silver eagle. By using the visual test, you can identify several red flags to weed out the counterfeit eagles. Having the same minted year will help with minor differences that may occur between each strike. You can see font differences alone on both the obverse and reverse should be enough to spot the fake. (Ignore the glossy and mirror finishes).

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Here we have the reverse, again font differences stand out especially the tail on the “U”. The missing ‘veins’ on the feathers and leaves are another big giveaway on this fake.

For silver eagles, pay special attention to the fonts: letters, numbers, upper/lowercase. Note: the US mint changed the font in 2008 so 1987-2007 coins and 2008 – present have a different font. Also the ‘veins’ on the feathers and leaves on the back side.

This is by no means exhaustive and depending on the producer, different fakes will leave different red flags. You can only assume as time goes by, these counterfeit rings will get better and better, so be diligent.

real-vs-fake-silver-american-eagle-coin image www.scamsfakes.com

6. Bleach Test

Another cheap and simple way to test for real silver vs. fake is to use some household bleach. Silver will tarnish very fast when exposed to any sort of oxidizing chemical like bleach. All you will need is just 1 drop, place it on the silver and if it begins to turn black then you can check it is silver. If your coin has numismatic value of any sort, this test may reduce its premium and you may want to perform another test. (Silver-plated items will also pass this test)

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7. Ping Test

The great thing about silver is that it has a certain high-pitched ring to it when struck with another metal, many people refer to this as the ping test and it works fairly well. To do this, simply place one silver coin on your fingertip and take another between your thumb and forefinger and gently tap your coin. It should produce a nice high-pitched bell ring.

Silver Eagle Coin Ping Test – 6145 Hz

The neat thing about this test is that silver rings at a certain frequency of about 6145 Hz. Watch the video below to hear the difference between a real vs. fake American silver eagle.

Caveat: While the ping test is a great method to check for fake silver bars or coins, it is not foolproof. You will always want to combine this with the magnetic slide and dimensions test.

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8. Buy From Reputable Dealers

If you are buying silver coins or bars on ebay or craigslist, there is a higher probability that you will encounter a fake. A little common sense will go a long ways! While there may be deals to snatch up there, it may be best to go with a licensed & reputable dealer even if the premium is slightly higher. If you are looking to buy junk silver from ebay, you can get their melt values using our US Coin Value Calculator.

Here are some silver scam identifiers on ebay, watch out for these fraud keywords:

Silver-Plated – Like it says, this is any base-metal with a silver plating on the outside to fool the naked eye.

100 mills – This word is deceptive, it is stating the measurement of the thickness of the silver plate. They can even state 99.9% silver since the plate is pure silver. Just another fancy word for silver or gold-plated.

Silver Clad – Just read the definition of clad: to bond a metal to (another metal), especially to provide with a protective coat. Yes, again silver-plated.

Replica or Copy – If this word is in the title or description you can be sure that it is not pure silver.

Nickel Silver – While this has a silver appearance, it has a composition of 60% copper, 20% nickel, and 20% zinc. You can read more about it here.

German Silver – Another term for nickel silver, see above.

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We recommend the following 3 online bullion dealers, just remember to do your own due diligence:

bgasc-logo image www.scamsfakes.comapmex logo image www.scamsfakes.comlogo-silvertowne logo image www.scamsfakes.com

Be sure to read our gold and silver dealer user reviews, and please leave feedback if you have bought from any of these dealers!

9. The Specific Gravity Test

These next 4 tests are highly accurate in determining real vs. fake. The specific gravity test of silver is basically a ratio of densities and due to its chemical & composition makeup should equal ~ 10.49, given by the formula below:
Specific Gravity of Silver
This test will weed out those silver-plated or clad coins if they have a composition of some other base metal. You cannot change the density of metal and pure silver will always give a reading close to 10.49. To calculate this perform the steps below:

  1. Obtain dry weight of the silver coin or bar with an accurate scale to .01g
  2. Use a cup of water enough to fully submerge the silver into and measure its weight or reset the scale with it on.
  3. Tie some string around the coin and setup an apparatus to hold the coin
  4. Submerge the silver into the water and record the submerged weight minus the weight of the water & cup.
  5. Divide the dry weight by the submerged weight to obtain the specific gravity of silver

Be warned: Sophisticated counterfeiters also have ways of combining certain metals together to get a similar specific gravity readout. Using this test together with the ring test & visual test should be able to detect these types of fakes.

Homemade specific gravity testing of silver below:

specific-gravity-of-silver image www.scamsfakes.com

10. The Acid Test

Another test with high accuracy, this test uses acid solution usually of nitric acid and muriatic acid. You will have to purchase this from a dealer or on amazon. Just search for silver acid testing kit or puritest. You will also want to get a testing stone to use with the solution.

silver testing acid image www.scamsfakes.com

While this test can immediately verify pure silver, it will damage the coin. So it is best to use this is you bought a lot of coins or bars and want to test 1-2 for purity.

These are dangerous chemicals and should not be done by children. Always wear goggles and gloves when performing the test. Do not use on numismatics, this will lower the value of the coin.

If you suspect the outside is silver-plated, you may need to file through an edge to get to the center metal in order to test. Once the acid is placed, pure silver will stay a certain color, while fake silver will turn a different color depending on the metal used to counterfeit. This test is also really useful for testing sterling silver if you’re not sure that platter you bought at the goodwill is 925

acid-test-silver image www.scamsfakes.com

11. XRF Analyzers

If you’re serious about silver or maybe ultra paranoid, you may consider investing in a portable or handheld XRF Analyzer. XRF is short for X-ray fluorescence, and is used not only in detecting precious metals but all sorts of metal alloys, mining samples, environmental assessments etc …

niton-xl2 silver analyser image www.scamsfakes.com

These handheld device are just like scanners, point and shoot, and the device will give an accurate readout of the metal composition. If you’re interested in getting one of these cool little toys, 2 companies that make them are Niton and Bruker. Be warned these are extremely pricey can run over $10,000 and are usually carried only by gold/silver bullion or jeweler shops.

12. Ultrasonic Thickness Test

If XRF analyzers are out of your price range, but you still want a scientific tool to determine real vs. counterfeit silver, an ultrasonic thickness gauge may be for you.

What this test does is measure how long it takes for sound to travel through a metal object, in our case silver. If your bar is pure silver, it will give an accurate reading, if it is a mix of metals, the reading will be off. For different metals, you will get different readouts of thickness. This is also a great way to test for fake gold coins and bars.

The speed of sound for silver is 3650 meters/second at room temperature.
You can check the speed of sound of other metals here. Gold is 3240 m/s.

ultrasonic-thickness-gauge silver tester image www.scamsfakes.com

Here’s how this works:

  1. Set the device to a velocity of 3,650
  2. Measure the silver bar with a proper caliper
  3. Place a dab of glycerin on the bar where you will measure the thickness
  4. Measure the thickness with the sensor
  5. Readout thickness should match the actual thickness of the bar (in mm)

This works really well for large silver bars or ingots. If the bar is plated in silver/gold it will give an inaccurate thickness tipping you off that the silver is counterfeited with some other metal. From here you could perform a few other tests to confirm your suspicion.

If you are a regular buyer of silver bars this maybe the tester for you as you can buy an entry-level gauge for several hundred dollars unlike the expensive XRF analyzers. Here is one for less than $200 on Amazon. Perhaps a wise investment.

The video below shows a demonstration of how to properly perform this test:

13. Fire Assay

If you are still testing for purity here, you probably shouldn’t be in the industry buying silver  With that said, probably the most sure-fire way on how to test for silver purity and avoid fake silver bullion is through fire assay. With one caveat, this is also the most destructive test as well.

Unfortunately for this test you will need a melting furnace, special cupels, pinchers, etc … The degree of accuracy is uncanny, as when testing bullion products you can have accurate parts of 1 in 10,000! If you fancy to learn more about this procedure you can read about it here.

fire-assay-molten silver image www.scamfakes.com

If you have other ways to test for silver, please let us know or leave us a comment and we will be sure to include them!

This article was sourced from >> http://www.silvercoins.com/fake-silver-coins-14-ways-to-spot-counterfeits/

FAKE CHINESE BULLION DEALERS VIDEO & OTHERS BELOW

The below videos were sourced from >> http://goldsilver.com

Ping test for gold >> Gold Eagle Coin Ping Test – 4498 Hz

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How are these fake bullion products being produced?

There are basically two methods being utilized in fake gold and silver coin and bar production:

– There are plated gold and silver coins and bars, consisting of a thin layer of gold or silver covering base metal alloys underneath.

– Then there are hallowed out gold and silver bars and coins with thicker covers of gold and or silver, filled with tungsten, lead, copper, and or nickel.

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Henry Sapiecha