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NZ Man in court over alleged $1.2m scammed from pensioners

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A 48-YEAR-OLD Kiwi has been extradited back from New Zealand to face 21 boiler room fraud charges that police claim stripped retirees of their superannuation and others to the tune of $1.2 million.

The man, who is due to appear in Maroochydore Magistrates Court this afternoon, was the alleged ringleader of the Gold Coast-based scam, police claim.

Victims were lured into the scam with cold calls or by visiting websites set up by the group, Detective Senior Sergeant Daren Edwards alleged.

They were drip fed a small amount of cash to get them to pour more in.

He said the “callous” alleged fraudster had blown most of the $1.2 million on a luxury Gold Coast lifestyle and police did not yet have any assets to strip from the man.

“It was to do with safe racing and betting,” Sen Sgt Edwards said.

“Some of the allegations are that some of the complainants received some of the funding back so they appeared they were getting returns however that was just a phoenix set up. Once an investor put money in they would drip feed some of the other investors money to give the false impression they were getting money,” he alleged.

Snr Sgt Edwards alleged one West Australian victim invested $300,000 into the scam while another Sunshine Coast man in his 70s put in more than $70,000.

A second man has been charged on the Gold Coast.

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Henry Sapiecha

This Android ransomware threatens to expose your browsing history to all your contacts

This Android ransomware threatens to expose your browsing history to all your contacts

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A form of Android ransomware which threatens to send the victim’s private information and web history to all of their contacts has been discovered in the official Google Play app store.

Uncovered by researchers at McAfee, LeakerLocker doesn’t actually encrypt the victims’ files, but instead claims to have made a backup of data stored on the device and threatens to share it with all of the user’s phone and email contacts.

Those behind the malware demand $50 in exchange for not leaking personal data including photos, Facebook messages, web history, emails, location history and more, playing on fears of potential embarrassment rather than any form of cryptography.

Two applications in the Google Play Store contained the malware, Wallpapers Blur HD, which has been downloaded between 5,000 and 10,000 times, and Booster & Cleaner Pro, which has been downloaded between 1,000 and 5,000 times.

The combined number of downloads means that up to 15,000 people have fallen victim to this ransomware, which has been in the Google Play Store since at least April. Both apps have good review scores, suggesting that those behind the scheme have been giving them fake reviews.

Once downloaded, LeakerLocker asks for vast swathes of permissions, including the ability to manage calls, read and send messages, and have access to contacts — overreaching for the apps the malware is claiming to be — before communicating with a receiver, initiating the malicious activity and locking the homescreen of the device with the extortion threat.

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LeakerLocker attempts to extort victims into paying a ransom by threatening to release their personal data.

Image: McAfee

It’s true that the malware can gain access to private information — thanks to its victims granting permissions at installation time — but not all the private data LeakerLocker claims to have access to can be seen or leaked.

However, analysis of the code shows it’s capable of at least accessing an email address, some contact information, Chrome browser history, text messages and calls, and photos from the camera.

Snippets of this data are chosen at random to convince the victim that all their data has been copied — although at this point the information hasn’t actually been copied, but it could happen if the control server issues relevant instructions.

This basic form of ransomware demands the ransom via credit card, although researchers advise infected victims not to pay because there’s is no guarantee that the information will be released or not used to blackmail victims again.

McAfee researchers have reported LeakerLocker to Google, which says it’s “investigating” — and it appears that the two apps including the malware have been removed from the Google Play store.

It’s far from the first time malware has infiltrated Android’s official app marketplace and is indicative of Google’s continuing battle against cybercriminals sneaking malware into the store.

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Henry Sapiecha

Lottery officials confirm $70m scam Hervey Bay Qld Australia

Too good to be true – An instagram scam, claiming to be an account of a Hervey Bay winner of 70 million dollars, is hooking followers into sharing their bank and paypal account information.

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A SCAM warning is in place after a fraudster masquerading as a $70million Hervey Bay lottery winner began targeting locals online.

The Chronicle understands the scammer is attempting to capitalise on the region’s recent lucky streak where locals have taken out two major jackpots.

On Tuesday, an Instagram user by the name of Susan Croper posted a photo of a woman holding a cheque for $70 million addressed to ‘Hervey Bay grandparents’.

The photo caption read “Just about 1 year ago I walked in and collected my $70million cheque. To mark this day we would like to give something a little back to the hard workers of this lovely world”.

The fraudster continued by announcing the next 50,000 people to like, comment, share and tag Susan Croper in the picture would receive $1000 via Paypal or bank transfer.

A link was also provided in the account description which claimed to provide “proof”.

Last year, a retired Hervey Bay Couple was in fact lucky enough to take out a $70m lotto jackpot.

A Hervey Bay man won $30million last month.

But Golden Casket spokesperson, Elissa Lewis, confirmed the post was a hoax and not linked to any actual winners.

“(The grandparents) still hold the record for the largest single ticket lottery win in Australian lotto history,” Ms Lewis said.

“Unfortunately someone is trying to take credit for their profit.”

Ms Lewis said Golden Casket was working closely with Instagram, Google and Facebook to have the hoax shut down.

In the meantime, readers are being urged to remember never to pass on their personal details online.

“If anyone suspects a lottery scam they should report them to Scam Watch,” she said.

“If they think they’ve handed over personal details but aren’t sure if the party is legitimate, it becomes a legal matter and they should contact their local police.

“We just caution customers to be aware of these sorts of requests because if it seems like easy money, it is not.”

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Henry Sapiecha

www.money-au.com

CREDIT REPAIR SCAM

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Thieves are preying upon consumers when they need help the most by claiming to fix their bad credit.

In the credit repair scam, con artists claim they can erase bad credit, remove bankruptcies or liens and even create a new credit history. The thieves usually ask for an upfront payment in cash.

Legitimate credit repair companies are required to provide a person’s legal rights in a written contract, give a three-day window to cancel without any charge and provide the cost of the services.

TIPS:

  • Check your credit history and dispute inaccurate information
  • Do not pay for services before they are rendered
  • Obtain legitimate credit counseling from a nonprofit credit repair agency or your bank or credit union

For more information, you may contact the Fair Trade Commission at www.fraud.org and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau at www.consumerfinance.gov.

www.creditcardseasy.net

www.money-au.com

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Henry Sapiecha

Phishing? How to protect yourself from scam emails and much more

Don’t click on that email! Find everything you need to know in this phishing guide including how to protect yourself from one of the most common forms of cyber attack.

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What is phishing?

Phishing is one of the easiest forms of cyber attack for a criminal to carry out, but one which can provide these crooks with everything they need to infiltrate every aspect of their targets’ personal and working lives.

Usually carried out over email – although the scam has now spread to social media, messaging services and apps – a basic phishing attack attempts to trick the target into doing what the scammer wants. That might be handing over passwords to make it easier to hack a company, or altering bank details so that payments go to fraudsters instead of the correct account.

The aim and the precise mechanics of the scams vary: victims might be tricked into a clicking a link through to a fake webpage with the aim of persuading them user to enter personal information. Other campaigns involve tricking users into downloading and installing malware – for stealthy approach to theft – or inadvertently installing ransomware, providing the attacker with much more immediate profit.

More complex phishing schemes can involve a long game, with hackers using fake social media profiles, emails and more to build up a rapport with the victim over months or even years in cases where specific individuals are targeted for specific data which they would only ever hand over to people they trusted.

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That data can be as simple as an email address and password, to financial data such as credit card details or online banking credentials or even personal data such as date of birth, address and a social security number.

In the hands of hackers, all of that can be used to carry out fraud, be it identity theft or using stolen data to buy things or even selling people’s private information on the dark web. In some cases, it’s done for blackmail or to embarrass the victim.

In other cases, phishing is one of the tools used for espionage or by state-backed hacking groups to spy on opponents and organisations of interest.

And anyone can be a victim, ranging from the Democratic National Committee, to critical infrastructure, to commercial businesses and even individuals

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Whatever the ultimate goal of the attack, phishing revolves around scammers tricking users into giving up data or access to systems in the mistaken belief they are dealing with someone they know or trust.

How does a phishing attack work?

A basic phishing attack attempts to trick a user into entering personal details or other confidential information, and email is the most common method of performing these attacks.

The sheer number of emails sent every single day means that it’s an obvious attack vector for cyber criminals. It’s estimated that 3.7 billion people send around 269 billion emails every single day.

Researchers at Symantec suggest that almost one in every 2,000 of these emails is a phishing email, meaning around 135 million phishing attacks are attempted every day.

Most people simply don’t have the time to carefully analyse every message which lands in their inbox – and it’s this which phishers look to exploit in a number of ways.

Scams vary in their targets – some are aiming at unwary consumers. Here, their email subject line will be designed to catch the victim’s eye – common phishing campaign techniques include offers of prizes won in fake competitions such as lotteries or contests by retailers offering a ‘winning voucher’.

In this example, in order to ‘win’ the prize, the victims are asked to enter their details such as name, date of birth, address and bank details in order to claim. Obviously, there’s no prize and all they’ve done is put their personal details into the hands of hackers.

A young woman is overjoyed by message on her tablet computer stating she has won a prize, not realizing it is a scam.

A young woman is overjoyed by message on her tablet computer stating she has won a prize, not realizing it is a scam.

Similar techniques are used in other scams in which attackers claim to be from banks looking to verify details, online shops attempting to verify non-existent purchases or sometimes — even more cheekily — attackers will claim to be from tech security companies and that they need access to information in order to keep their customers safe.

Other scams, usually more sophisticated, aim at business users. Here attackers might also pose as someone from within the same organisation or one of its suppliers and will ask you to download an attachment which they claim contains information about a contract or deal.

In many cases the file will unleash malicious software onto the system – in many cases it will harvest personal data, but it in many cases it’s also used to deploy ransomware or rope systems into a botnet.

Attackers will often use high-profile events as a lure in order to reach their end goals. For example, a major campaign used the lure of the 2016 Olympic Games to help distribute malware in the run up to the event.

In many cases the malicious payload will be hidden inside a Microsoft Office document which requires the user to enable macros to run. The payload will trick the victim into enabling them by claiming that an update needs to be installed or permissions need to be given to allow the document to be viewed properly. But if users allows the payload to run they and their company are likely to be in big trouble.

Why is phishing called phishing?

The overall term for these scams — phishing — is a modified version of ‘fishing’ except in this instance the fisherman is the cyber attacker and they’re trying to catch you and reel you in with their sneaky email lure.

It’s also likely a reference to hacker history: some of the earliest hackers were known as ‘phreaks’ or ‘phreakers’ and it’s likely a reference back to that.

When did phishing begin?

The consensus is the first example of the word phishing occurred in the mid-1990s with the use of software tools like AOHell which attempted to steal AOL user names and passwords.

These early attacks were successful because it was a new type of attack, something users hadn’t seen before. AOL provided warnings to users about the risks, but phishing remained successful and it’s still here over 20 years on. In many ways, it has remained very much the same for one simple reason – because it works.

How did phishing evolve?

While the fundamental concept of phishing hasn’t changed much, there have been tweaks and experimentations across two decades as technology and how we access the internet has changed. Following the initial AOL attacks, email became the most appealing attack vector for phishing scams as home internet use took off and a personal email address started to become more common.

Many early phishing scams came with tell-tale signs that they were not legitimate – including strange spelling, weird formatting, low-res images and messages which often didn’t make complete sense. Nonetheless, in the early days of the internet, people knew even less about potential threats which meant that these attacks still found success – many of these are still effective.

Some phishing campaigns remain really, really obvious to spot – like the prince who wants to leave his fortune to you, his one long lost relative, but others have become to be so advanced that it’s virtually impossible to tell them apart from authentic messages. Some might even look like they come from your friends, family, colleagues or even your boss.

What’s the cost of phishing attacks?

It’s hard to put a total cost on the fraud that flows from phishing scams, but earlier this year the FBI suggested that the impact of such scams could be costing US business somewhere around $5bn a year, with thousands of companies hit by scams every year.

One example of a high profile incident: in July 2017 MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada fell victim to a phishing attack.

“A series of fraudulent emails convinced university staff to change electronic banking information for one of the university’s major vendors. The fraud resulted in the transfer of $11.8 million to a bank account that staff believed belonged to the vendor,” the university said in a statement.

What types of phishing scams are there?

The ‘spray and pray’ is the least sophisticated type of phishing attack, whereby basic, generic messages are mass-mailed to millions of users. These are the ‘URGENT message from your bank’ and ‘You’ve won the lottery’ messages which look to panic victims into making an error — or blind them with greed.

Schemes of this sort are so basic that there’s often not even a fake webpage involved – victims are often just told to respond to the attacker via email. Sometimes emails might play on the pure curiosity of the victim, simply appearing as blank message with a malicious attachment to download. This is the way Locky ransomware is spread and it’s one of the most effective forms of the file-encrypting malware around.

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A simple Locky distribution phishing email – it looks basic, but if it didn’t work, attackers wouldn’t be using it.These attacks are mostly ineffective, but the sheer number of messages being sent out means that there will be people who fall for the scam and inadvertently send details to cyber attackers who’ll exploit the information in any way they can.

What is spear phishing?

Spear phishing is more advanced than a regular phishing message and aims at specific groups or even particular individuals. Instead of vague messages being sent, criminals design them to target anything from a specific organisation, to a department within that organisation or even an individual in order to ensure the greatest chance that the email is read and the scam is fallen for.

It’s these sorts of specially crafted messages which have often been the entry point for a number of high profile cyber attacks and hacking incidents.

At a consumer level, it can be designed to look like an update from your bank, it could say you’ve ordered something online, it could relate to any one of your online accounts. Hackers have even been known to seek out victims of data breaches and pose as security professionals warning victims of compromise – and that targets should ensure their account is still secure by entering their account details into this handy link.

While spear phishing does target consumers and individual internet users, it’s much more effective for cyber criminals to use it as a means of infiltrating the network of a target organisation.

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Lure document used in a ransomware attack against a hospital – attackers used official logos and names to make the email and the attachment look legitimate.
This particular type of phishing message can come in a number of forms including a false customer query, a false invoice from a contractor or partner company, a false request to look at a document from a colleague, or even in some cases, a message which looks as if it comes directly from the CEO or another executive.
Rather than being a random message, the idea is to make it look as if it has come from a trusted source, and coax the target into either installing malware or handing over confidential credentials or information. These scams take more effort but there’s a bigger potential payback for crooks too.What is CEO fraud?

CEO fraud is a very specific type of phishing campaign which usually targets staff in the financial or human resources department of a business.

The target receives an email from the attacker which is disguised to look as if it comes from the CEO of the company or some other high level executive and – sometimes after a period of small talk to build up trust – it requests and urgent transfer of money to a particular account.

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CEO fraud sees attackers posing as executives and sending multiple messages back and forth with victims. Image: Trend Micro

Usually some sort of business reason is given such as the funds being required for a new contract or something similar. Of course, this message isn’t from the CEO at all and the account doesn’t belong to anyone within the company, but rather the attacker, who before the victim knows understands what is going on, has made off with a significant sum.

It’s thought that at least $5 billion has been lost as a result of this particular form of phishing scam and law enforcement has warned that it continues to rise.

Other types of phishing attacks

While email still remains a large focus of attackers carrying out phishing campaigns, the world is very different to how it was when phishing first started. No longer is email the only means of targeting a victim as the rise of mobile devices, social media and more have provided attackers with a wider variety of vectors to use for attacking victims.

Social media phishing

With billions of people around the world using social media services such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, attackers are no longer restricted to use one means of sending messages to potential victims.

Some attacks are simple and easy to spot: a Twitter bot might send you a private message containing a shortened URL which leads to something bad such as malware or maybe even a fake request for payment details.

But there are other attacks which play a longer game. A common tactic used by phishers is to pose as a person – often an attractive women – using photos ripped from the internet, be it stock imagery or someone’s public profile. Often these are just harvesting Facebook ‘friends’ for some future nefarious means and don’t actually interact with the target.

However, sometimes plain old catfishing comes into play, with the attacker establishing a dialogue with the (often male) target – all while posing as a fake persona.

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The ‘Mia Ash’ social media phishing campaign saw attackers operate a fake social media presence as if the fake persona was real. Image: SecureWorks

After a certain amount of time – it could be hours, it could be months – the attacker might concoct a false story and ask the victim for details of some kind such as bank details, information, even login credentials, before disappearing into the ether with their gains.

These campaigns can be completely random, but some are specifically targeted with hackers running an entire online persona of a fake person across multiple social media sites in order to look like an authentic, real living person.

One campaign of this nature targeted individuals in organisations in the financial, oil and technology sectors with advanced social engineering based around a single, prolific social media persona that was absolutely fake.

Those behind ‘Mia Ash’ are thought to have been working on behalf of the Iranian government and tricked victims into handing over login credentials and private documents.

SMS and mobile phishing

The rise of mobile messaging services – Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp in particular – has provided phishers with a new method of attack, with the fact that smartphones are now in the pocket of the victims making them almost immediately accessible.

Attackers don’t even need to use emails or instant messaging apps in order to meet the end goal of distributing malware or stealing credentials – the internet connected nature of the modern way phone means text messages are also an effective attack vector.

A SMS phishing – or Smishing – attack works in much the same way as an email attack, presenting the victim with a fraudulent offer or fake warning as a malicious incentive to click through to a malicious URL.

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Text messages offer another attack vector to criminals. Image: Action Fraud

The nature of text messaging means the smishing message is short and designed to grab the attention of the victim, often with the aim of panicking them into clicking on the phishing URL within. A common attack by smishers is to pose as a bank and fraudulently warn that the victim’s account has been closed, had finances from it withdrawn or is otherwise compromised.

The truncated nature of the message often doesn’t provide the victim with enough information to realise the message is fraudulent, especially when text messages don’t contain tell-tale signs such as a sender address.

Once the victim has clicked on the link, the attack works in the same way as a regular phishing attack, with the victim duped into handing over their information and credentials to the perpetrator.

How to spot a phishing attack

The whole point of attackers carrying out phishing attacks is to use deception in order to trick victims into compromising themselves, be it by installing malware onto the network, handing over login credentials or parting with financial data.

While at its heart phishing remains one of the most basic forms of cyber attack, the simple fact of the matter is that it works – and it’s been working for over two decades.

While many in the information security sector might raise an eyebrow when it comes to the lack of sophistication of some phishing campaigns, it’s easy to forget that there are billions of internet users – and everyday there are people who are only accessing the internet for the first time.

Large swathes of internet users therefore won’t even be aware about the potential threat of phishing, let alone that they might be targeted by attackers using it – why would they even suspect that the message in their inbox isn’t actually from the organisation or even friend it says it’s from?

But while some phishing campaigns are so sophisticated and specially crafted that the message looks totally authentic, there are some key give-aways in less advanced campaigns which can make it obvious to spot an attempted attack.

Signs of phishing: Poor spelling and grammar

Many of the less professional phishing operators still make basic errors in their messages – notably when it comes to spelling and grammar.

Official messages from any major organisation are unlikely to contain bad spelling or grammar, let alone repeated instances throughout the body – so poorly written messages should act as an immediate warning that the message might not be legitimate.

It’s common for attackers to use a service like Google Translate to translate the text from their own first language, but despite the popularity of these service they still struggles to make messages sound natural.

Shortened or odd URLs in phishing emails

It’s very common for email phishing messages to coerce the victim into clicking through a link to a malicious of fake website designed for malicious purposes.

Many examples of phishing attacks will invite the victim to click through to an official-looking URL. However, if the user takes a second to examine the link more closely, they can hover the pointer over it and often find that while the text seems like the legitimate link, the actual web address is different.

In some instances, it can simply be a shortened URL, whereby the attackers hope the victim won’t check the link at all and just click through. In other instances, attackers will take a minor variation on a legitimate web address and hope the user doesn’t notice.

"Minsk, Belarus - October 27, 2011: Official website Blizzard. Photo taken from the monitor."

“Minsk, Belarus – October 27, 2011: Official website Blizzard. Photo taken from the monitor.”

Attackers tried to take advantage of the Blizzard data breach by sending phishing emails claiming to be from Blizzard about account security

For example, a campaign once targeted online gamers after game developer Blizzard was hacked. Attackers spammed messages claiming that the victim had their World of Warcraft account compromised in the breach and asked them to click on a link and enter their details in order to secure it. The malicious link had only one minor difference to the real URL – the L in ‘World’ had been switched to a 1.

Ultimately, if you are suspicious of a URL in an email, hover over it to examine the landing page address and if it looks fake, don’t click on it. And check that it is the correct URL and not one that looks very similar but slightly different to that which you’d usually expect.

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A strange or mismatched sender address

You receive a message that looks to be from an official company account. The message warns you that there’s been some strange activity using your account and urges you to click the link provided to verify your login details and the actions which have taken place.

The message looks legitimate, with good spelling and grammar, the correct formatting and the right company logo, address and even contact email address in the body of the message. But what about the sender address?

In many instances, the phisher can’t fake a real address and just hope that readers don’t check. Often the sender address will just be listed as a string of characters rather than as sent from an official source.

Another trick is to make the sender address almost look exactly like the company – for example, one campaign claiming to be from ‘Microsoft’s Security Team’ urged customers to reply with personal details to ensure they weren’t hacked. However, there isn’t a division of Microsoft with that name – and it probably would it be based in Uzbekistan, where the email was sent from.

Keep an eye on the sender address to ensure that the message is legitimately from who it says it is.

The message looks strange and too good to be true

Congratulations! You’ve just won the lottery/free airline tickets/a voucher to spend in our store – now just provide us with all of your personal information including your bank details to claim the prize. As is the case with many things in life, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

In many cases, phishing emails with the aim of distributing malware will be sent in a blank message containing an attachment – never clicking on mysterious, unsolicited attachment is a very good tactic when it comes to not falling victim.

Even if the message is more fleshed out and looks as if it came from someone within your organisation, if you think the message might not be legitimate, contact someone else in the company – over the phone or in person rather than over email if necessary – to ensure that they really did send it.

How to protect against phishing attacks

Training, training and more training. It might seem like a simple idea, but training is effective. Teaching staff what to look out for when it comes to a phishing email can go a long way to protecting your organisation from malicious attacks.

Exercises such as enabling staff to make errors – and crucially learn from them – in a protected sandbox environment or carrying out authorised penetration testing against employees can both be used to help alert users to potential threats and how to spot them.

At a technical level, disabling macros from being run on computers in your network can play a big part in protecting employees from attacks. Macros aren’t designed to be malicious – they’re designed to help users perform repetitive tasks with keyboard shortcuts.

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Documents dropped by phishing attacks often ask the victim to enable Macros so as to enable the malicious payload to work. Image: Digital Guardian

However, the same processes can be exploited by attackers in order to help them execute malicious code and drop malware payloads.

Most newer versions of Office automatically disable macros, but it’s worth checking to ensure that this is the case for all the computers on your network – it can act as a major barrier to phishing emails attempting to deliver a malicious payload.

The future of phishing

It might have been around for almost twenty years, but phishing remains a threat for two reasons – it’s simple to carry out – even by one-person operations – and it works, because there’s still plenty of people on the internet who aren’t aware of the threats they face. And even the most sophisticated users can be caught out from time to time.

For seasoned security personnel or technologically savvy people, it might seem strange that there are people out there who can easily fall for a ‘You’ve won the lottery’ or ‘We’re your bank, please enter your details here’.

But there are billions of people in the world who don’t regularly use the internet or are just unaware that the internet is something which criminals might use to target them. Unfortunately, criminals are there looking to scam and deceive people and it’s easiest to do it to people who are naive or overly trusting. And the low cost of phishing campaigns and the extremely low chances of scammers getting caught means it remains a very attractive option for fraudsters.

Because of this, phishing will continue as cyber criminals look to profit from stealing data and dropping malware in the laziest way possible. But it can be stopped and by knowing what to look for and by employing training when necessary, you can try to ensure that your organisation doesn’t become a victim.

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Henry Sapiecha

Man in Qld Australia scammed of $400,000 for worthless scrap paper

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A WEALTHY Queensland man has lost $400,000 buying blackened “US bank notes” that turned out to be worthless pieces of scrap paper.

The notorious “black money” sting has hit Queensland before, but never on the scale inflicted on one hapless investor in Brisbane.

In a separate scam, two pensioner brothers from Longreach have been fleeced of $350,000 after being conned into believing they’d won a $23 million lottery.

And a Brisbane woman was talked into buying $89,000 worth of iTunes cards after being convinced she was helping Telstra catch computer hackers.

Police say these are some of the latest victims of a barrage of scams hitting the state, with 90 Queenslanders a day reporting they have been conned.

In the “black money” sting, scammers convinced the victim they had genuine US bank notes that had been coated in black paint.

A liquid solution was meant to clean the notes, but after buying them at a reduced rate the victim was scrap paper rather than the millions of dollars in profit that had been promised.

The scheme is also known as the Nigerian “wash wash” scam due to it reportedly originating in the African country about 17 years ago.

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The Longreach brothers were in partial care when they were told they had won 15.5 million euros ($23.2 million).

They had been targeted by what is known as an “advance fee fraud”, in which victims hand over money on the promise they will receive a lottery win or inheritance.

Detective Superintendent Terry Lawrence, head of the police Financial and Cyber Crimes Group, warned that vulnerable people were still falling for the scam despite it operating for years.

“They pushed $350,000 out in the belief they would be getting all these millions back,” Supt Lawrence said.

“It was their life savings for their care and everything like that. It’s just gone.”

The iTunes card scam involved a fake Telstra worker convincing the Brisbane woman her computer had been hacked.

The scammer then convinced the woman Telstra was transferring money to her account to help catch the hacker.

Over three days in July, she bought $89,000 worth of iTunes cards and handed them over, her money gone with little chance of a recovery.

The names of major brands such as energy retailers, phone companies and supermarkets are frequently used in the scams.

Bargain hunters, gamblers, online dating users and business owners are among those targeted, with some schemes tailored to match the time of the year.

“At tax time they do the Australian Taxation Office. Come Christmas it will be online sales or hotel accommodation,” Supt Lawrence said.

But it is believed only a fraction of those scammed report their losses to authorities.

In a recent investigation into a Gold Coast boiler room operation, police established there were about 1000 victims but only 200 came forward.

“A lot of people don’t report because they’re embarrassed – or it’s an amount they don’t think is worth reporting,” Supt Lawrence said.

Detective Senior Constable Andrew Browne, also from the financial crimes squad, said scam messages purporting to be from firms such as Telstra or Origin Energy were sent to 100,000 people or more at a time.

“They know they’re the biggest providers of power or phone bills so therefore they’ve got their biggest chance of success. They’re all trusted brands people use,” Constable Browne said.

In another scam busted by police this year, a Gold Coast man who paid for a brand-name BBQ was one of hundreds of people who ordered goods from a sham online trader that never delivered.

Two Latvian fake traders were advertising discounted Weber barbecues and other goods online but customers never received them. The pair was arrested in Brisbane and charged with multiple counts of fraud.

A new Queensland police campaign, R U in Control, is publicising scams as they occur.

Supt Lawrence said: “If people just take that second to have a bit of a think before falling for it, we could prevent much of this fraud together. You decide, not the scammers.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Australians targeted by Amazon spam scam

Australians have been targeted by scammers purporting to be the retail giant Amazon and promising them $500 Amazon vouchers.

The scammers used Amazon’s well-publicised expansion into Australia as a hook.

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People at the weekend received a legitimate-looking email offering $500 Amazon vouchers to those who clicked on a link and provided feedback on the company.

The email’s subject line was, “Amazon Card for you. Confirm before it expires.” The email featured the Amazon logo, and a cartoon of a man holding a clipboard in front of a bus, with an arrow and the words ‘Confirm my voucher’ running across the picture.

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The email says the “expansion of Amazon into Australia is fast approaching. We will soon begin operating brick and mortar distribution and retail centers [sic] in all states across Australia.”

It continues, “Of course, Aussie consumers are no strangers to Amazon. In the past few years we have built strong relationship with you and we are here to say thank you!

“In order to express our gratitude towards Aussie consumers, we are coming to you with a $500 Amazon Voucher.

“We have 80 Vouchers to give away this weekend. All you need to do is: Confirm receiving this email by clicking here. Give us your opinion about Amazon

“That’s simple, right?

“Thank you and Good luck!”

The email was signed off by “Your Prime Team,” referring to Amazon Prime, Amazon’s membership offer which provides fast shipping to members.

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While the email stated it had been sent to people who had “subscribed to offer emails”, recipients included people who had never ordered anything from Amazon or signed up for a membership.

Delia Rickard, deputy chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, said seven people had reported the “genuine-looking” scam to the watchdog – and none had clicked on the link.

“One of the things that scammers are good at is piggy-backing on a topical event,” she said.

She said it was unclear whether the scam was motivated to spread malware, or to trick people into giving out private information that could be used for identity theft or onsold to other scammers.

The watchdog advises people to verify whether an offer is legitimate by “checking if it is listed on the retailers’ official website or by calling the retailers’ official customer service line.”

Amazon’s public relations firm Weber Shandwick declined to comment.

Amazon’s Australian plans

After Fairfax Media broke the news of Amazon’s Australian expansion plans in 2016, Amazon confirmed its plans in April and promised thousands of new jobs, millions in additional investment, and to “empower small Australian businesses through Amazon Marketplace”.

While Amazon is known for its online marketplace, it has been investing in bricks and mortar stores too.

As at last month, it had six bookstores (soon to be 12), pop-up stores, college pick-up points, and a convenience store without checkouts that is being tested in Seattle. Its finance chief last month described bricks and mortar physical stores as “another way to reach the customer”.

International sales accounted for 32 per cent of Amazon’s sales for the three months to 31 March. International sales were up 16 per cent year-on-year but continued to be unprofitable.

Amazon has been pouring big money into international expansion, particular in India. Its capital expenditure surged 51 per cent year-on-year, primarily due to investment in fulfilment centres, or large warehouses.

Amazon operates its online grocery delivery service Amazon Fresh in 21 cities in the US as well as London and Tokyo, which opened last month.

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Henry Sapiecha

Losses from reported Australian hacking victims quadrupled in 2016: ACCC

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The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has reported a four-fold increase in hacking scams, with AU$2.9 million lost to such activity in 2016, up from AU$700,000 in 2015.

According to Targeting scams: Report of the ACCC on scams activity 2016, businesses bore the brunt of these scams, with over half — AU$1.7 million — being attributed to businesses.

“While the digital economy presents many opportunities and efficiencies for businesses, it also presents significant risks,” ACCC deputy chair Delia Rickard says in the report’s foreword.

“Scams targeting businesses are becoming increasingly sophisticated using modern technology to make fake emails, invoices and websites appear legitimate to even the astute business person.”

While the digital age is hitting businesses in Australia, the report [PDF] highlights that consumers are also being affected by scammers, with digitisation providing the opportunity for scammers to try new tricks.

Online scams — those executed via the internet, email, social networks, and mobile apps — outnumbered phone-based scams in 2016, with an increase of 130 percent over 2015.

Elsewhere in the report, losses to online scams accounted for 58 percent — AU$48.4 million — of total losses, while social media was a particularly busy platform used by scammers to lure victims, netting losses of AU$9.5 million in 2016 compared with AU$3.8 million in 2015.

Of the social media scams, the most prevalent were related to online dating and sextortion, a form of blackmail in which compromising images of the victim are used to extort money.

Business scams top $3.8 million: ACCC

Jason King wasn’t surprised to get an email from the chairman of Launceston Church Grammar School’s board asking him to process a payment to Hong Kong that day.

The school sometimes has cause to make payments to Hong Kong for the school’s accountant, so there was no immediate concern.

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“It had [the chairman’s] name and an email address that looked reasonable,” Mr King says. “They were asking for a payment of $121,780. That was the red flag as we don’t ever pay that much to Hong Kong.”

Mr King called the chairman who knew nothing at all about the payment and hadn’t sent the email.

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Scams on the rise

It was a close call for the school and data released by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission on Friday shows scams suffered by businesses are on the rise.

Nearly 6000 businesses reported being targeted by scams in 2016, according to the watchdog’s Targeting Scams report. Losses totalled about $3.8 million, an increase of almost 31 per cent.

The highest losses were to computer hacking, fake investment schemes and buying and selling scams, according to reports to Scamwatch over the past year.

Small businesses with fewer than 20 staff are in particular the most vulnerable and accounted for nearly 60 per cent of reported losses.

Lack of reporting

ACCC deputy chairman Michael Schaper says the $3.8 million in reported scams is “really the tip of the iceberg”.

“We already know it’s a well established phenomenon that most of the people who contact Scamwatch haven’t actually lost money, only 10 per cent have,” he says. “We know that small businesses are much more reluctant to report losses. There are two reasons, one is the time and energy and the second one is that a lot of small business think that if they report a scam their insurance premiums are going to be threatened.”

Mr Schaper says while small businesses are less likely than the general public to report a scam, small businesses are also a far more attractive target than the general public.

“It’s easier to find them; those [businesses] trading online have a website presence and you can work out who to target,” he says. “Secondly, we know small businesses don’t have good record keeping systems in many cases and their software is often very basic so they are ripe pickings.”

We know small businesses don’t have good record keeping systems in many cases and their software is often very basic so they are ripe pickings.

Michael Schaper

Mr Schaper says recent events with the WannaCry ransomware scam show businesses can be just as vulnerable to scams as anyone else in the community.

There are “steep increases” in scammers contacting businesses, according to the ACCC.

What to look out for

The top three scams identified by Scamwatch against businesses are:

  1. Ransomware. These scams trick a victim into downloading a virus that infects computer systems and prevents user access until payment is made to unlock it. In 2016, reports indicate that there was an increase in ransomware emails to businesses, purportedly from legitimate companies such as Australia Post or a utility provider.
  2. Business email compromise scams. These are a form of hacking scam that operate by the scammer obtaining access to a business’ email address. The scammer will then send an email (purportedly from senior management) to the business’ suppliers advising of new payment arrangements and requesting a wire transfer to the new account.
  3. Investment scams. These scams are promoted as business opportunities (for example sports investment or stock broker scams, superannuation schemes or managed funds) and promise inflated returns but are, in reality, nothing more than a method used to drain a business of its funds.

Mr Schaper says 85 per cent of scammers make contact with businesses via email or phone so it is important to be wary. He says small businesses can help protect themselves by backing up data.

“Backing up your data and keeping it offline or backing it up to the cloud is the single most important thing you can do to protect yourself from that threat,” he says. “If you pay a false bill by and large it won’t be the death knell of your business but if you lose all the information about your clients you could lose your business overnight.”

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Henry Sapiecha

SCAMMERS 15 VIDEOS TO WATCH FOR YOUR PROTECTION-SERIES 1

1…Secrets of The Scammers (Fraud Documentary)

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2…Nigerian Scams Documentary 2016 : Nigerian Scammers Show No Mercy !

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3…$500,000 scammed from a woman by 5 NIGERIANS

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4…Woman loses $150,000 in online dating scam

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5…BBC Series “You have been Scammed – Street Lottery Scam”

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6…Bernie Madoff : Scamming of America – The $50 Billion Ponzi Scheme

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7…How Suze Orman SCAMMED the World (2016)

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8…Internet Scammers – Documentary 2015

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9…Internet Scammers and Caught on Tape

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10…Credit card Scammers caught on camera

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11…Credit Card Thieves Caught on Tape Using Skimmers | Nightline | ABC News

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12…SCAMMED in China – The man trap

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13…Wham Bam Thank You Scam

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14…Scam City Delhi – Should Not Be Missed

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15…Scam City | Rio de Janeiro | Full Episode

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Henry Sapiecha