Rss

Archives for : IMPERSONATIONS

Foreign students are arrested after they are caught forging signatures and taking out money from Australian banks in multi-million dollar RIPOFF

Strike Force police have caught out international students scamming millions from banks as part of an overseas criminal syndicate group.

Those involved have been using forged signatures and documents to convince bank staff they are the the legitimate bank account holders, and then withdrawing the cash.

Twenty-four people have been arrested so far with more to follow, and 288 charges have been laid by police over $2.5 million stolen from banks, the Daily Telegraph reported.

Mostof the perpetrators were in Australia on student visas.

In some cases, the syndicate has been bypassing the banks verification systems by taking over mobile phone numbers of victims, the publication declared.

strike-force-police-have-caught-out-international-students-scamming-millions-from-banks-as-part-of-an-overseas-criminal-syndicate-image-www-scamsfakes-com

© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Twenty-four people have been arrested, and 288 charges have been laid by police over $2.5 million stolen from banks Many of those who have been caught have been already sentenced to jail since Strike Force Wilmot was established in 2013.  

One man was sentenced to a minimum of 20 months prison in January, while another was jailed in February.

twenty-four-people-have-been-arrested-and-288-charges-have-been-laid-by-police-over-2-5-million-stolen-from-banks-image-www-scamsfakes-com
NSW Police cyber crime chief Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis told the Daily Telegraph Strike Force Wilmot did an awesome job catching those persons involved.

‘We have worked very closely with the financial institutions in order to identify those responsible,’ Det Katsogiannis said.

www.crimefiles.net

www.intelagencies.com

hottest_girls_250_250

Henry Sapiecha

ACCC: Australians were duped over AU$2.1m to Cryptocurrency-related scams in 2017

A detailed report from Australia’s consumer watchdog found many locals got caught up in ‘pyramid’ cryptocurrency schemes last year, hoping to capitalise on the ‘success’ of bitcoin.

mobile-cryptocurrency-image-www-scamsfakes-net

“As the value of actual cryptocurrencies increased, so too did the scam losses in what people thought were real investments,” the report continued. “By the end of the year, reports of losses related to cryptocurrencies exceeded AU$2.1 million but as with other scams, this is likely the very tip of the iceberg.”

According to the ACCC, examples of cryptocurrency scams in 2017 included fake initial coin offerings (ICOs), which purport to be the launch of a new cryptocurrency.

Other scams, the ACCC said, capitalised on the general confusion about how cryptocurrency works and instead of people discovering how to directly buy cryptocurrencies, many found themselves caught up in what were essentially pyramid schemes.

“A number of reports showed that victims entered into cryptocurrency-based scams through friends and family who convinced them they were onto a good thing, a classic element of pyramid schemes,” the watchdog wrote.

“Not all cryptocurrency-related scams involved victims attempting to invest in stocks or initial coin offerings. Many scammers also ask for payment through cryptocurrencies for a variety of scams because it is easier to remain anonymous while receiving payment.”

An example is paying ransomware through bitcoin.

In total, the ACCC reported Australians lost AU$340 million to scammers in 2017, the highest loss since stats were put on record.

More than 200,000 scam reports were submitted to the ACCC, the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN), and other federal and state-based government agencies in 2017.

Investment scams topped the losses at AU$64 million; while dating and romance scams caused the second greatest losses at AU$42 million.

“Some scams are becoming very sophisticated and hard to spot. Scammers use modern technology like social media to contact and deceive their victims. In the past few years, reports indicate scammers are using aggressive techniques both over the phone and online,” ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said.

According to the ACCC, Scamwatch received almost 33,000 reports of threat-based impersonation scams in 2017. It said over AU$4.7 million was reported lost and more than 2,800 people gave their personal information to these scammers.

“The ATO will never threaten you with immediate arrest; Telstra will never need to access your computer to ‘fix’ a problem; and Centrelink will never require a fee to pay money it owes you,” Rickard continued. “Finally, none of these organisations will ask you to pay using iTunes gift cards.”

www.intelagencies.com

www.crimefiles.net

www.clublibido.com (8)

RELATED COVERAGE

Woman posed as police officers in elaborate two-year ‘catfish’ scam

LAUREN Adderley took on a number of different identities to make her catfishing victim believe exactly what she wanted him to believe.

lauren-adderley-21-had-only-been-in-a-relationship-with-mitchell-lloyd-for-two-months-when-she-was-18-but-she-became-fixated-on-him-image-www-scamsfakes-com

A JEALOUS woman who posed as fake police officers to control her ex-boyfriend and stop him from seeing other women has been jailed.

Lauren Adderley, 21, used “sophisticated catfish style behaviour” to convince her former partner Mitchell Lloyd, 22, he was part of a police investigation.

She even made the young man believe he was subject to police curfews, creating email accounts to pose as cops and threaten him with fines if he did not obey the orders.

Using fake names including Darren Clarke, Elaine Thomas and Robert Hay, the young woman jealously told him to end relationships he had started, and even that he was not allowed to speak to specific people — particularly other women.

In the elaborate scheme, she also pretended to be her own friends on Facebook to send messages to Lloyd, criticising him for going out with other girls.

In sentencing, Peter Rouch QC, said: “I do not know what was going through your mind in December 2014 but at that time you decided to deliberately adopt the persona of a police officer to contact Mitchell Lloyd.

“At that time, he did not want a relationship with you.

“For two years you controlled Mitchell Lloyd’s life, to the extent that you told him where he could go and who he could go out with.”

The threats even included fines of about $4900 if he did not obey.

The couple had met through mutual friends during a night out, with their brief sexual relationship ending after two months in 2014.

But in a victim impact statement, the young man said that he had felt pressurised and blackmailed for two years after the relationship.

At one point, Shrewsbury Crown Court heard the young woman had even threatened to kill herself with a pair of scissors, later telling him “No one can ever love you like I love you x.”

Recorder Rouch told her: “These are serious crimes, as he could not live his life properly during the two years that you committed these offences.

“You did that for your own benefit, whatever that may have been.”

It wasn’t until the young man told colleagues at work about the curfews — including one that told he was no longer able to go to a public house he had taken his mother and sister to — that he alerted police.

Genuine officers were immediately able to deduce that the emails were fake, and traced them back to Adderley.

Paul Smith, defending, added: “Perhaps the key point in mitigation other than the early plea is her age. She was 18 when the offences began back in 2014.

“She has no previous convictions and has taken full responsibility for what she did.”

Jason Corden-Bowen, District Crown Prosecutor and Domestic Abuse Lead with West Midlands Crown Prosecution Service, said: “Lauren Adderley created a complicated fiction of multiple fake profiles interacting with each other to her own satisfaction and reason.

“She used this sophisticated catfish-style behaviour to completely manipulate the victim’s life, dictating when he could go out, where he could go and controlled his social interaction with other people for over two years.

“The impact her actions had on the victim’s life cannot be understated and I would like to pay tribute to him for helping bring Adderley to justice.”

www.crimefiles.net

www.goodgirlsgo.com

club-libido-banner-schoolgirls-x-2

Henry Sapiecha